Review: Everything, Everything

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything

Publication date: September 1st 2015

Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Number of pages: 320

Genre: YA Contemporary

Source: Received in exchange for review. This has not influenced the content of my review.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

This innovative, heartfelt debut novel tells the story of a girl who’s literally allergic to the outside world. When a new family moves in next door, she begins a complicated romance that challenges everything she’s ever known. The narrative unfolds via vignettes, diary entries, texts, charts, lists, illustrations, and more.

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.

 

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

Rare diseases, first love and a cute guy next door…what could go wrong, right?

Well naïve little reader, a lot. And unfortunately in my opinion, that didn’t just apply to the storyline but the actual book as well.

The good and bad per point I want to talk about seems to evenly have their ups and downs. For example, the idea of having such a rare disease of being allergic to everything was really cool. In fact, I’d say it was the guiding reason as to why I was so immensely so excited about reading this book.

But at the same time, I actually blame that for why the story was so slow. The author didn’t really have all that much to work with. The story kind of dragged on a big because nothing really happened. I mean – the girl was stuck inside the same building all day and night. In that sense I don’t really blame the author at all.

I thought it was a good way to deal with the messages that the book was trying to get across. And they were excellent messages for sure. Just again, I think they could have been handled better.

Why? Exhibit A: The plot twist. Really? That was predictable. Although the way that the main character got to this point was questionable at best. A lot of the decisions made seemed kind of selfish and naïve. Yet, she had reason to be so.

The other thing was that I was unsure as to how it was actually possible for a particular event to unfold. Maybe things are totally different in Australia but I find it difficult to believe that it was possible

All in all, I really liked this book. I did have my issues with it but I am super excited to read more by this author.

3.5/5 comets
Looks like the start of an apocalypse! Nearly there. 

Add Everything, Everything to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Nicola YoonNicola Yoon grew up in Jamaica (the island) and Brooklyn (part of Long Island). She currently resides in Los Angeles, CA with her husband and daughter, both of whom she loves beyond all reason. Everything, Everything is her first novel.

Review: Kissing in America

Kissing in America by Margo Rabb

Kissing in America

Publication date:  May 26th 2015

Publisher: Harper

Number of pages: 400

Series: N/A

Genre: YA Contemporary

Source: Received in exchange for review. This has not influenced my review.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

“Wise, inspiring, and ultimately uplifting—not to be missed.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
“A hilarious, thought-provoking, wrenching, and joyful quest.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review
“Authentic and complex…This is a smart teen’s novel.”—Booklist, starred review

Acclaimed writer Margo Rabb’s Kissing in America is “a wonderful novel about friendship, love, travel, life, hope, poetry, intelligence, and the inner lives of girls,” raves internationally bestselling author Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love).

In the two years since her father died, sixteen-year-old Eva has found comfort in reading romance novels—118 of them, to be exact—to dull the pain of her loss that’s still so present. Her romantic fantasies become a reality when she meets Will, who seems to truly understand Eva’s grief. Unfortunately, after Eva falls head-over-heels for him, he picks up and moves to California without any warning. Not wanting to lose the only person who has been able to pull her out of sadness—and, perhaps, her shot at real love—Eva and her best friend, Annie, concoct a plan to travel to the west coast to see Will again. As they road trip across America, Eva and Annie confront the complex truth about love.

In this honest and emotional journey that National Book Award finalist Sara Zarr calls “gorgeous, funny, and joyous,” readers will experience the highs of infatuation and the lows of heartache as Eva contends with love in all of its forms.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

Cute and fun, Kissing in America makes for a great in-between kind of read. For when you need to break from the hardcore stuff.

I say this because while it was good, it wasn’t great. One of those reads for me. The good and the bad seemed to balance themselves out for me. For example, I really enjoyed the beginning but I wasn’t impressed by the end.

I actually became interested in this book first when I read a sample as part of the Buzz Books 2015 sample collection. I absolutely loved the sample and therefore the beginning. In fact the excerpts from the romance novels the main character read really amused me. Particularly the use of “man-dew”. Just wow.

Speaking of the romance novels bit, I found them to be a win-lose kind of deal. I loved reading about a character who loved those cheap, trashy books I see going ridiculously cheap in bins in department store. I thought it was cute and quirky. And I kind of relate to her in some ways, although I tend to stray from those particular types of books. But I didn’t like their influence on the story. I felt like they almost kind of made her stupid.

I know that’s a harsh thing to say. But the way she obsessed over a boy which to be honest she didn’t even know that well,from what I read in the book anyway. And it’s pretty sad that she went to such extremes to follow a crush to another city. Borderline concerning. The way she treated her best friend in that sense was pretty average.

The book was a pretty quick read for me. Particularly the first half. The second half wasn’t as good. Most of the second half was travelling actually, and that really slowed it down too much.

I don’t feel like there’s much more to say. I would recommend this book, even if it doesn’t sound like it. Maybe borrow rather than buy is what I’m saying.

3/5 comets
The Earth shook. If they thought the Leaning Tower of Pisa was leaning before…

Add Kissing in America to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Margo RabbShort bio: I love books, chocolate, cats (especially of the Edward Gorey variety), old movies, and more chocolate.

Long bio: I’m the author of the novels Kissing in America and Cures for Heartbreak, and I’ve written essays, articles, book reviews, and short stories for The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, The Atlantic, Slate, The Rumpus, Zoetrope: All-Story, Seventeen, Best New American Voices, New Stories from the South, and One Story, and elsewhere. I grew up in Queens, NY, and recently moved from Austin, TX to Philadelphia, PA. I write about grief a lot (my mom died when I was in my teens and my dad died when I was in my twenties). Here’s a link to an essay I wrote recently, about the death of my cat and the death of my mom (it was published, coincidentally, on the 24th anniversary of my mom’s death):

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/…

Thank you for taking a look at the stuff I’ve written–sending you some virtual chocolate as you read! 🙂

website: www.margorabb.com
Twitter: @margorabb

Review: Vendetta

Vendetta by Catherine Doyle

Vendetta (Blood for Blood, #1)

Publication date: January 1st 2015

Publisher: Chicken House Ltd.

Number of pages: 352

Series: Blood for Blood (#1)

Genre: YA Contemporary

Source: Borrowed. All opinions in this review are my own and are in no way influenced by the source of the book.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

When it comes to revenge, love is a dangerous complication.With a fierce rivalry raging between two warring families, falling in love is the deadliest thing Sophie could do. An epic debut set outside modern-day Chicago.

When five brothers move into the abandoned mansion in her neighbourhood, Sophie Gracewell’s life changes forever. Irresistibly drawn to bad boy Nicoli, Sophie finds herself falling into a criminal underworld governed by powerful families. As the boys’ dark secrets begin to come to light, Sophie is confronted with stinging truths about her own family, too. She must choose between two warring dynasties – the one she was born into, and the one she is falling in love with. When she does, blood will spill and hearts will break.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

What do you get when you cross 5 hot Italian guys (well actually apparently only 4 of them were hot) with blood and revenge?

Well according to this book, the mafia.

crazy animated GIF

I’m going to be clear here: I’ve never read a book about the mafia before. They’re (unfortunately) not something you see everyday. I wish there were more because things can get CRAZY.

My first point is going to be on the topic of the plot. I actually thought things were pretty lacking in this department. No, I’m not going against what I said about crazy shenanigans in this book. But until the end, I felt that Vendetta seriously lacked plot. It really just seemed to be the same thing over and over again.

Per esempio:
DO YOU LIKE MY ITALIAN?! Thank you. But anyway –
Sophie: “I’m going to get really excited and/or nervous about a conversation I’m about to have with the 5 Italian guys who have just moved in. But I’m gonna be sarcastic to cover it up.”
Millie: “I’m British.”
Luca: “I’m going to be a complete pig to you Sophie.”
Nic: “And I’m gonna make it better again. But then I’m going to run away.”

And repeat.

Ok, that was a little mean and exaggerated, but I genuinely felt like that little scenario thing was getting repeated through out the book. Like not much actually really happened at all apart from conversations between the characters and maybe with something minor going on in the background.

But then I got towards the end and things got wild.

AwesomenessTV animated GIF

See, that’s why I said crazy. All the crazy just happened at the end and it was enough to redeem all the wrongs in the world.

The rest of the book was setting up for the finale really (and an amazing plot twist) and it did do a phenomenal job. But the thing is, you still have to read through that part to get to the good stuff.

The best thing about Vendetta was probably the writing. The characters were believable and all of them really likeable, if not a little bit predictable (see typical conversation above). There was quite a bit of humour involved, and while it wasn’t die-laughing-kind-of-funny, you could still chuckle a tad. I love that kind of things in books and that’s why all dystopians kind of seem the same to me now. A lot of them have no personality.

Another thing I really liked was the Italian involved. Just a few phrases here and there. I get upset if there are books about people in or from countries that don’t speak English and there aren’t phrases from the foreign language in there. It makes me sad.

I read a physical copy of this book and OH MY GOODNESS. I would just buy this book in the shop if I just saw the outside. The edition I read was so beautiful. It was writing on the side of the pages, a really beautiful cover and the spine is amazing.

I really liked the book but I have a deep fear that by the time the sequel comes out I will have forgotten everything that happened. But I would really like to read it. Although I have no idea where it could possibly go.

And I absolutely would recommend this book. I hope this review didn’t come off as too negative but I really didn’t intend for it to. It was a good book and worth reading.

3/5 comets
The Earth shook. If they thought the Leaning Tower of Pisa was leaning before…

Add Vendetta to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Catherine DoyleCatherine Doyle was born in the West of Ireland in 1990. She holds a BA in Psychology and an MA in English. As a child she was an annoying smarty-pants with an overactive imagination. She feels lucky to have now found a healthy outlet for her tendency to make up stories. Her debut YA novel, VENDETTA, is the first in a trilogy. The novel takes place in modern-day Chicago, where Catherine’s mother grew up.

Review: Fangirl

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Fangirl

Publication date: September 10th 2013

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

Number of pages: 445

Series: N/A

Genre: YA Contemporary

Source: Won from Nara @ Looking for the Panacea. Nara, you’re still my favourite person on the planet. However, in no way did this influence my review.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

From the author of the New York Times bestseller Eleanor & Park.

A coming-of-age tale of fan fiction, family and first love.

Cath is a Simon Snow fan.

Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan…

But for Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere.

Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to.

Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words… And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

For Cath, the question is: Can she do this?

Can she make it without Wren holding her hand? Is she ready to start living her own life? Writing her own stories?

And does she even want to move on if it means leaving Simon Snow behind?

“Touching and utterly real.” —  Publisher’s Weekly

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

No one told me a bunny rabbit and a kitten had a love child and that love child wrote a book.

WHY NOT!?

This book was just SO cute. And SO good.

Fangirl is the story of Cath and what she has to go through when she has to uproot her life and move to college. Cath and her twin sister Wren used to be super-close and they always had eachother to fangirl with. But that was before college. Now Wren is trying to mature a little (what a weirdo) and pull away from Cath and her old life a little.

Bascially Cath is my alter-ego. Seriously. We both are extremely (EXTREMELY) shy people. I was reading this book and was basically like ‘Oh. So this is what would happen if I lived in America and therefore went to college’ the whole time I was reading it.

I love how Rainbow Rowell always knows just how to tackle an issue. It’s actually pretty amazing. She can take something cool and make it ten times cooler. And a YA book about fanfiction is pretty cool. While I don’t read fanfiction myself, it was amazing to actually learn more about it and I actually kinda understand it more now. I never realised what a big thing it was, which sounds kinda terrible. But you can tell that Rainbow Rowell has seriously done her research.

The only other book by Raibow Rowell other than Fangirl that I’ve read is Eleanor and Park, and already I can see a common theme between the two that I am a fan of: the way that the author handles the tough stuff. She really does do a phenomenal job. Not only are her books realistic in the way they are written, but also in the way that her characters act and deal with tough times.

I’d love to say that I’m freaking out over the release of the Simon Snow fanfiction book thing that the author is releasing later on this year, but I can’t really say that I’m bothered. While the fanfiction in the book was ok, it seemed a little like the same thing every time it came up. Baz and Simon fighting everytime and then a lovey dovey moment. Meh. Unless it was the actual author of actual Simon Snow books (her name might of been Gemma T. Leslie or something? I probably got that wrong), then it was just boring but at least it wasn’t always the same. However, that being said, I actually preferred Cath’s fanfiction over the actual stuff.

I actually have so many book boyfriends it’s ridiculous but I have another now. Levi. Oh my goodness. WOW. He is actually like my dream guy (well, if I was being super picky he’d have dark hair…but…that’s weird). He was cute and funny and smart and perfect and amazing. And I ran out of adjectives. But really, believe me, he’s great. Better than great, actually.

If you still haven’t read Fangirl, then what are you doing. And I actually shouldn’t be one to judge since it took me so long to read it myself but build a bridge. Sorry, that was rude. I’m getting passionate. Shoot me. But please don’t.

4/5 comets
Meteor shower. A great show.

Add Fangirl to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Rainbow RowellRainbow Rowell writes books. Sometimes she writes about adults (ATTACHMENTS and LANDLINE). Sometimes she writes about teenagers (ELEANOR & PARK and FANGIRL). But she always writes about people who talk a lot. And people who feel like they’re screwing up. And people who fall in love.

When she’s not writing, Rainbow is reading comic books, planning Disney World trips and arguing about things that don’t really matter in the big scheme of things.

She lives in Nebraska with her husband and two sons.

More at rainbowrowell.com.

A Small Madness Review

A Small Madness by Dianne Touchell

A Small Madness

Publication date: January 28th 2015

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

Number of pages: 240

Series: N/A

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Source: Received in exchange for review (thank you so much Allen & Unwin!!). This is my honest opinion.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

Rose didn’t tell anyone about it. She wondered if it showed. She looked at herself in the mirror and turned this way and then that way. She stood as close to the mirror as she could, leaning over the bathroom basin, looking into her own eyes until they disappeared behind the fog of her breath. Looking for something. Some evidence that she was different now. Something had shifted inside her, a gear being ratcheted over a clunky cog, gaining torque, starting her up. But it didn’t show. How could all of these feelings not show? She was a woman now but it didn’t show and she couldn’t tell anyone.

A devastating, compelling novel that will get everyone talking, from the author of Creepy and Maud.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

My head hurts so badly right now. It’s expected since it was ONLY TWISTED TO EPIC PROPORTIONS.

There just aren’t words for what this book made me go through. Thank goodness for that, actually.

A Small Madness tells the story of a girl named Rose. I will warn you, that if you are really uncomfortable with the topic of teen pregnancy or particularly, sex, in books then I’m telling you now that you will not be comfortable with this book. This is a raw, gritty portrayal of teen pregnancy and the author doesn’t gloss over anything.

But that’s one of the reasons why this book really touched me.

We see how the way that the main character, Rose, is forced to deal with her pregnancy and how it transforms her. The things she does. I can’t even. It’s so heartbreaking and really does bring up themes that really aren’t dealt with enough in YA.

There are many reasons which drew me to this book. The initial being the both the topic and the writing style. I’ve never read anything before on teen pregnancy and I was pretty curious. Also, from the synopsis I could tell I would like the writing style (I love books written with that kind of detached but yet very intimate and descriptive style). I also love reading books by Aussie authors and the cover is stunning. And totally suits the tone and mood of the book. And this is weird, but it actually feels really nice.

So when I completely (unexpectedly) got this in the mail for review I completely freaked. And I may have ditched the book I was reading in favour of A Small Madness. I know. Terrible. I had just really, really looking forward to reading this ever since I first heard about this, ok? So I sat down and read, starting it late on a school night (with not much time left after homework before I actually had to go to bed) and finishing it within half an hour the next morning. I was just so, so into the story and needed to know what was going to happen.

I also read with my mouth gaping open for a short while. True story.

I just had this feeling of complete and total dread as to what was going to happen (which was thanks to the author’s brilliant writing) and knew that I wasn’t going to be completely with it until I knew what was going to happen to the characters.

Although I was not a fan of the ending. It was a little too open for my liking. I just think that while open endings can work, in realistic fiction it is particularly important to wrap-up the story and preferably provide closure.

If all Dianne Touchell’s books are like this, then I really need to look into reading them.

4/5 comets
Meteor shower. A great show.

Add A Small Madness to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Dianne TouchellDianne Touchell is a middle child who feared Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy — and any other stranger who threatened to break into the house at night.

She has worked, amongst other things, as a nightclub singer, a fish and chip shop counter girl (not with Pauline Hanson) and a bookseller. Dianne would rather talk to her dog than answer the phone.

The Winner’s Crime

The Winner’s Crime by Marie Rutkoski

Publication date: March 12th 2015

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc (UK & ANZ)

Number of pages: 368

Series: The Winner’s Trilogy (2#)

Genre: YA Fantasy

Source: Received in exchange for review. This is my honest opinion.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis:

Lady Kestrel’s engagement to Valoria’s crown prince calls for great celebration: balls and performances, fireworks and revelry. But to Kestrel it means a cage of her own making. Embedded in the imperial court as a spy, she lives and breathes deceit and cannot confide in the one person she really longs to trust …

While Arin fights to keep his country’s freedom from the hands of his enemy, he suspects that Kestrel knows more than she shows. As Kestrel comes closer to uncovering a shocking secret, it might not be a dagger in the dark that cuts him open, but the truth.

Lies will come undone, and Kestrel and Arin learn just how much their crimes will cost them in this second book in the breathtaking Winner’s trilogy.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

There may be spoilers for the previous book…

Clever, dazzling and intricately woven, Marie Rutkoski stuns again with The Winner’s Crime. Now, Kestrel has to tread more carefully than ever.

The first and foremost thing I love about these books is Kestrel. She’s witty, brave and generally quite awesome. I love the way that she doesn’t have to be a supreme physical fighter to kick butt, but rather she wields her skill with strategising and her intelligence. It’s pretty great that she can still be such a strong heroine while not being a Katniss (The Hunger Games) or Tris (Divergent) in the way that there is less emphasis on physical fighting. Not that emphasis on physical fighting is a bad thing, I’m just saying that I like that it’s something a little different for me.

I’m guessing that if you read the above paragraph you won’t be very surprised that I preferred the parts of the text that were centered around Kestel (or Kestrel and Arin) rather than just Arin. Even in the last book I wasn’t a major supporter of Team Arin. He just falls kind of flat for me and I don’t a) find him particularly interesting, or b) like him that much. I find that he can be a little bit too moody and he just doesn’t really jump out at me.

I love the game that the characters are playing. The book so wonderfully shows the consequences of the actions of the characters and it’s all so carefully and cleverly plotted. It’s just so unpredictable that you really don’t know what move the characters are going to play next and what’s going to happen. And yet I feel like I know the characters so well.

…And I’m about to contradict myself. I did see the ending coming. But I didn’t mind so much because I was unsure and it did still hit pretty hard. One scene in particular towards the end between Kestrel and another character was really painful.

But enough about the sad scenes – because PUPPY! If there is a cute puppy in any book then I can just about promise you that I will love the book. Dogs are the best thing ever (sorry cat lovers) and they are the most cutest, loyalist creatures. AND PUPPIES ARE ADORABLE.

These books have made me really interested in playing the game Kestrel plays in the book: Bite & Sting. It sounds so cool and I’d love to know what it’s based off. So if you know…please do share.

I did feel very sorry for Verex though. To be honest I wouldn’t even have minded if Kestrel’s love switched to Verex rather than Arin. And I could not stand Jess in this book. I don’t really sympathise with her whatsoever.

All in all, I thought that this was a stunning sequel that actually surpassed The Winner’s Curse in my opinion. If you loved the first book, you will love this one.

4.5/5 comets
KABOOM! That only leaves one continent (one little flaw). 

Add The Winner’s Crime to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio:

Marie RutkoskiMarie Rutkoski is the author of the YA novel The Shadow Society and the children’s fantasy series The Kronos Chronicles, including The Cabinet of Wonders, The Celestial Globe and The Jewel of the Kalderash. Her next project is a YA trilogy that begins with The Winner’s Curse, which is scheduled to be published in March 2014.

Marie grew up in Bolingbrook, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago), as the oldest of four children. She holds a BA from the University of Iowa and a PhD from Harvard University. Marie is currently a professor at Brooklyn College, where she teaches Renaissance Drama, children’s literature and fiction writing. She lives in New York City with her husband and two sons.

http://us.macmillan.com/author/marier…

Review: Starlet’s Web

Starlet’s Web by Carla Hanna

Starlet's Web (The Starlet, #1)

Publication date: November 2nd 2012

Publisher: Createspace

Number of pages: 310

Series: The Starlet (1#)

Genre: YA/NA Contemporary

Source: Received in exchange for review. This is my honest opinion.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads synopsis extract:

Love. Lies. Acting. A novel about celebrity influence & teens in Hollywood. What makes a star shine? Humility empowers the spirit. Sometimes.

Discover the Starlet Series for new adult & college readers and uncover the life of a talented actress caught in Hollywood’s web of lies.

I’m actress Liana Marie Michael. I won an Oscar at 17 but whatever. Celebrity is what it is: marketing a product. I’m part of a tight-knit group. I keep to myself and don’t complain about my life. I’ve been happy until lately.

Evan dumping me leveled me. Matthew shocked me. I knew he couldn’t hurt me with my bodyguard so near, but his eyes…so I have trust issues. Dating super-hot Byron didn’t help clear the confusion either. I’m torn between going to church on Sunday and making a living from pop culture.

But experience builds perspective. My days of shutting up needed to end. First, I told Manuel. Then I told my mom. It turned out awesome until I learned the truth.

Now I’m screwed. Totally. Let’s face it: Hollywood’s web entangles everyone.

pagebreaksbookcomet

Review:

I really don’t know what to say. I was really, really not impressed.

I get that this book was trying to capture the exploitation of celebrities and their struggles, but really I didn’t like it.

Exhibit A: The main character. She was THE problem. And there were so many problems with her.
I thought she was ungrateful and arrogant. She drove me up the wall. She really could not seem to be able to look after herself in the slightest. And she didn’t exactly try and prevent half the awful situations she got herself into.

And quite frankly, I was disgusted with the romances. It felt like every page she was kissing a guy and whining about not feeling ‘turned on’. Yes, you read that right. The only half decent romantic interest was broken up with on the first page.

Don’t even get me started on Manuel. EURGH. Ick.
He did not come off as a great book boyfriend. Not only was he possessive, but also very, very rude. He didn’t even support Lia Marie when she needed it. Yeah, I get that it’s nice and all that he liked the ‘real her’ without makeup on and things, but she’s an actress. Sometimes she’s going to wear makeup. He shouldn’t tell her that he hates it. He should support her acting career and not act like a total brat.

In fact their whole relationship was terrible. They’d be fighting and then all of a sudden they’d decide that they are meant to be together. Then after two minutes of being together then Manuel would throw a hissy fit. That happened a lot and was very, very frustrating.

Back to Liana Marie. She spoke nothing really like a teenager. I would know. I am one. She spoke like she was reciting ‘assertive’ arguments that adults tell kids to say. Such as:
“You’re hurting my feelings, Manuel.”
She seemed to swap in between that and a slightly better persona.

However, I did like some things. I liked the way that this book delved into the world of business contracts and child working laws. I thought that was really interesting.

I started to enjoy the book a lot more when I got to the 50% mark. I was especially glued to the screen at around the 70% mark for reasons I shall not go into so I don’t spoil it. But to be honest I wasn’t really too keen on the twist anyway. It felt too…convenient? That’s not really the right word but I can’t think of any others right now.

I liked the angle that the author took. I think she chose well. And she was sure to include lots of diversity in terms of races, etc.

I know this review is pretty negative but just because it wasn’t for me doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t love it. I absolutely hate writing one star reviews. Please don’t forget that there are good points to this book as well.

1.5/5 comets
Just missed Earth. Almost ok.

Add Starlet’s Web to Goodreads

pagebreaksbookcomet

Goodreads author bio extract:

Carla J. Hanna is the author of award-winning young adult romance and coming of age fiction novels for readers who enjoyed Nicholas Sparks’ A Walk to Remember, Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love, Gayle Forman’s If I Stay, or John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars.

Mrs. Hanna lived in Santa Monica, CA where her children played with the children of celebrities. She mingled with plenty of nannies and a few good celebrity moms. She received her Master’s in English/Communications from Colorado State University and lives near Denver, CO with her husband and two children.